Transgender

(Redirected from Trans)
The transgender pride flag.
Transgender can be used as an umbrella term as well as an identity.

Transgender (or trans) is both a gender identity in its own right (e.g., transgender, trans woman, trans man, etc.) and an umbrella term. Under the umbrella are all people who do not identify with the gender they were assigned at birth, gender variant people, and all other identities outside the gender binary, e.g., bigender, agender, third gender, and non-binary identities.

Etymology

Trans is derived from the Latin prefix "trans-":

word-forming element meaning "across, beyond, through, on the other side of, to go beyond," from Latin trans-, from trans (prep.) "across, over, beyond," perhaps originally present participle of a verb *trare-, meaning "to cross," from PIE *tra-, variant of root *tere- (2) "to cross over" (see through). In chemical use indicating "a compound in which two characteristic groups are situated on opposite sides of an axis of a molecule" [Flood].[1]

Orientation

Transgender people, like people of any gender, can be of any orientation. Although it is common among transgender people, especially those who are non-binary, to use terms like androphile and gynephile, as opposed to heterosexual/homosexual. This is because the latter terms enforce the gender binary.

Usage

"Transgender", and "trans" are adjectives. In other words, they are used to modify nouns[2], e.g., "trans femme person", "transgender daughter", "trans woman", and so on.

Children

See the main article on this topic: Trans children

Many trans people realise they are trans when they are children. Of course, since they are children they are at the mercy of their parents' and society's understanding of their gender identity. If parents understand and accommodate for their children's clothing choices, their need to delay puberty, and so on, they can take steps to help their child; unfortunately this is rare.

Debi Jackson's letter addresses many of the issues trans children and their parents have to deal with that are caused by cultural cissexism and transmisogyny.[3][4][5]

See also

External links

References

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